PSA: Resource to Help Business with ADA Compliance

Nablo0608120x90

I am a self-proclaimed information junkie. In order to put my obsession to good use, I'll be continuing to offer links and info about resources near and dear to me. Today's resource is related to ADA (Americans With Disabilities Act) compliance. The best part about it: It's Free!

Reaching Out To Customers With Disabilities is an online course offered by the U.S. Department of Justice. It's your tax dollars at work, folks.

Here's a short excerpt from the course introduction:

The Americans with Disabilities Act


A brief introduction

The
goal of the ADA is to make it possible for people with disabilities to
participate in the everyday commercial, economic, and social activities
of American life.

The law covers
employment; state and local government programs, services, activities,
and facilities; and businesses and nonprofit service providers.  This
course focuses on the requirements that apply to businesses.



The ADA divides businesses into two categories



1.
Businesses and non-profit organizations that provide goods and services
to the public are called "public accommodations."  This includes
pharmacies, grocers, other retailers, restaurants, hotels, banks,
medical practices, legal offices, dry cleaners, night clubs, movie
theaters, art galleries, health spas, amusement parks, schools, child
care centers, and many other businesses.

There
are seven million businesses in the United States that fall in this
category, ranging from major chains to small mom-and-pop
establishments.  All the lessons in this course apply to businesses in
this category.

2.  Businesses
such as manufacturers or wholesalers are called "commercial
facilities."  Because they do not serve the public directly, they are
not public accommodations and they do not have to follow all the rules
for public accommodations.  Lessons three, eight, nine, and ten apply
to businesses in this category.

Source: http://www.ada.gov/reachingout/intro2.htm

The more you know...